Alleluia Evidence


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This is a brand new examination of the most clear and compelling evidence yet for the understanding of the Latin spelling and the pronunciation of IAUA as the name of God. In all my research of the Sacred Name, I have never seen anyone bring together all these pieces of information. A few have reached the same conclusion based on other less direct evidences.

Overcoming the goal of the "Ineffable Name" of Jewish tradition to obfuscate (obscure, confuse, or hide) the name of God requires careful research and the guidance of the Holy Spirit. This tradition changed the pronunciation of the name. It changed the way the name was written. It created a lie calling vowels, consonants. It resulted in the change of pronunciation and spelling of thousands of Hebrew/Jewish words and names.

Nevertheless, the truth is there for the earnest, diligent, and sincere student.

15 Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth.
II Timothy 2:15

I spent a couple of years studying linguistic comparisons of Hebrew words and names as I reached my current understanding of the Latin spelling and the pronunciation of the name of IAUA in September 2006. The next chapter will describe the results of this research. I continued developing evidences and explanations and three years later in August 2009, I was led by the inspiration of the Holy Spirit to investigate more deeply the word "alleluia".

The word "alleluia" is a most remarkable word. It was transliterated directly from a Hebrew phrase into the Septuagint translation of the Old Testament. It is important to understand the difference between translation and transliteration. Transliteration means these scholars selected the appropriate Greek letters to represent the Hebrew letters and maintain proper pronunciation. Translation means substituting a Greek word, which means the same thing as the Hebrew word.

The tradition of the "Ineffable Name" appears to have not yet been strong enough to stop this transliteration. Perhaps the power of the Holy Spirit deliberately preserved this transliteration to preserve evidence of the truth of the name of God.

The transliterated word was carried forward into the Greek of the New Testament, then into Latin and into English and many other languages, so that it is practically a universal word. It is among the best-known words in human speech. The word is directly related, almost identical, to the Hebrew phrase for "Praise God!" It is an expression of adoration, reverence, and confidence.

Septuagint Evidence

This examination of evidence to determine the Latin spelling and the pronunciation of the Sacred Name requires a reference to the Hebrew and Greek of the Bible. There are many resources readily available for this reference. Those with a computer have ready and immediate access to this information on the Internet.

The quickest and most complete reference to the Hebrew and Greek is found at this excellent Bible study website:

www.BlueLetterBible.org

The e-Sword program is an excellent Bible study tool for Hebrew and Greek, which you can use even when you cannot connect to the Internet. It is available for free download at this website:

www.e-Sword.net

As my source for this evidence, I start with the original Hebrew of the Old Testament Masoretic Texts. These texts are dated to between the seventh and tenth centuries AD. These texts contain added marks called vowel points, which did not appear in the original texts. These forced pronunciation to conform to tradition.

Then, I refer to the Septuagint translation from the Old Testament into Greek performed by Hebrew scholars about 250 BC. This makes the source and scholarship of these translations over a thousand years older than the Masoretic Texts. Finally, I compare the same critical word "alleluia", as found in the New Testament Greek Textus Receptus.

The Septuagint and most modern translations of the Bible follow the practice of the "Ineffable Name". This practice became Jewish tradition about 400 BC and became adopted as Christian tradition. The name of God was not to be spoken or written. The name of God is given as Kyrios in the Septuagint Old Testament. This practice was continued in the New Testament Greek. Most English translations substitute "the LORD" for the personal name of God.

Nevertheless, the Hebrew scholars who created the Septuagint translation could not avoid leaving at least one simple, incontrovertible piece of direct evidence. There is a phrase, which appears only in Psalms, where the short form of the name of God is tightly linked with the imperative of praise about 12 times.

The compound word "allelu-ia" appears to be such a common and critical expression in Hebrew it was not translated but transliterated. Therefore, we have a compelling witness of the proper transliteration of key letters and their pronunciation.

I believe the translation work of these Hebrew scholars who lived at the time of the ancient Hebrew and were fluent in the Greek of the time is the most valuable and conclusive evidence available.

Alleluia Verse Selection

This particular Old Testament verse is a perfect example of this witness because it shows the relation of the name and two examples of the Hebrew for the name of God. Psalms 113:1 is similar.

1 Praise ye the LORD. Praise ye the name of the LORD; praise him, O ye servants of the LORD.
Psalms 135:1

A more literal translation / transliteration of this scripture (following the Septuagint as an example) would be:

1 AlleluIA! Praise the name IAUA! Praise [him] servants of IAUA!
Psalms 135:1

The last part of the following verse from the New Testament is a great one for comparison because it emphasizes the English transliteration of the word "Alleluia", which is also immortalized in the "Hallelujah Chorus". Note the "Ineffable Name" and German influence on the spelling of the word in the title of the chorus.

6 And I heard as it were the voice of a great multitude, and as the voice of many waters, and as the voice of mighty thunderings, saying, Alleluia: for the Lord God omnipotent reigneth.
Revelation 19:6

Evidence Summary Chart

The back cover of the book contains a color-coded chart, which is a summary and illustration of the information presented in this chapter. I use color-coding to make the comparisons of the various elements clearer. There is also a black and white version inside the back cover, which can be copied without the overmarks and underlines. These are confusing without the color-coding.


IAUA Chart

You can place this chart (100 dpi) in a separate window, tiled with this explanation, to make it easier to cross-reference.

The chart is available for printing or viewing in web (100 dpi), presentation (200 dpi), print (300 dpi), and BW/print (300 dpi) versions suitable for various purposes. The content is not identical but all the relevent items are the same.

The information in the chart is a condensation and combination of what is found at:

http://www.blueletterbible.org/Bible.cfm?t=KJV&b=Psa&c=135&v=1&#conc/1

http://www.blueletterbible.org/Bible.cfm?b=Rev&c=19&v=1&t=KJV#conc/6


The chart is composed of two parts. The information in the top part of the chart is a condensation of what is found at www.BlueLetterBible.org with a concordance lookup of the beginning part of Psalms 135:1. The second part of the chart shows the ending part of Revelation 19:6, which contains the same key word, Alleluia.

The top section of the first part of the chart is the original Hebrew of the Old Testament "Masoretic Text" for the beginning of Psalms 135:1. I have removed the vowel points, which were added about the tenth century and are not a part of the earlier texts. This makes it easier to recognize the Hebrew letters.

The next section in the first part is three columns with a word-by-word listing of the text. The first column contains the English translation from the KJV, which may be a single word or a phrase. The second column contains the Strong's Hebrew Dictionary number, which links the English and Hebrew. The third column contains the root form of the Hebrew word in Hebrew script and a crude English transliteration / pronunciation.

The third section is the final section in the top part relating to the Old Testament text. This contains the comparison of the "Septaugint" translation from the Old Testament into Greek of this same verse performed by Hebrew scholars about 250 BC.

The top section of the second part of the chart is the original Greek of the New Testament "Textus Receptus" for the ending part of Revelation 19:6, which contains the focus word "alleluia".

The next section is three columns with a word-by-word listing of the text. The first column contains the English translation from the KJV, which may be a single word or a phrase. The second column contains the Strong's Greek Dictionary number, which links the English and Greek. The third column contains the root form of the Greek word in Greek script and a crude English transliteration / pronunciation.

Chart Explanation

The purpose of the chart is to show the relationship between the corresponding words and letters of the Hebrew, Greek, and English. Tracing this relationship is the evidence, which shows a witness to proper understanding of the best way to represent the name of God in English or more accurately, in any Latin based language.

In this study, we first trace the three important words (color-coded underlines) and then we trace the three important letters (color-coded overmarks). We begin with the Old Testament Hebrew, trace to the Old Testament Greek, the New Testament Greek, and finally Latin equivalent letters and pronunciation.

Allelu

The red underline is the word "Allelu", Strong's Hebrew Dictionary number H1984 ( הללו ) and the first part of Strong's Greek Dictionary number G239 (αλληλου).

Beginning at the top right of the chart, you can follow the red underlines to see the translation and transliteration of the Hebrew word for "praise" Remember, Hebrew is read following the letters and words from right to left. As you move down the chart, the transliteration to Greek is shown with a solid red underline. Greek is read following the letters from left to right the same as English.

Notice that the transliteration takes two Hebrew words and combines it into one word represented in Greek letters. The same word in the same verse is otherwise translated into a Greek word as shown with a dotted red line.

The conventional transliteration for the root word of the Hebrew is "HLL". This is based on a deception, which says Hebrew does not contain vowels. This deception results from a lie or just ignorance. The actual tense of the word is imperative, which adds "V" ("U") to the end of the word. The added letter is valuable and crucial because it is a part of the Tetragrammaton.

The Greek transliterates the phrase "HLLV YH" to the compound word "allelouia", which adds some additional vowels for pronunciation where the Hebrew leaves them out. I believe a more accurate transliteration of the Hebrew script is "ALLU IA". Finally, at the end of the chart you can see the KJV English transliteration "alleluia" of the Greek. The English removes one vowel to preserve pronunciation.

Note the confusion of the Strong's transliteration / pronunciation of the Greek, which adds "H" to the beginning of the word. I am sure this traces back to the obfuscation of the "Ineffable Name" tradition.

IA

The gold underline is the word "IA", Strong's Hebrew Dictionary number H3050 ( יה ) and the last part of Strong's Greek Dictionary number G239 (ια).

This part of the Tetragram is preserved in the transliteration of the compound Greek word, which combines "praise" with this short form of the name of God.

The conventional transliteration for the Hebrew word is "YH". This is again based on a deception, which says Hebrew does not contain vowels. The Greek transliterates "YH" to "IA" at the end of the compound word "allelou-ia".

IAUA

The blue underline is the word "IAUA", Strong's Hebrew Dictionary number H3068 ( יהוה ) and Strong's Greek Dictionary number G2962.

In traditional transliterations of Hebrew, this word is shown as "YHWH" or "YHVH". This is the result of the practice of the "Ineffable Name". Tracing this word from the Hebrew to the Greek shows the "Ineffable Name" was in full force. The Sacred Name was translated to Kyrios, which means a lord or master. Proper names should never be translated.

I

The red overmark traces the letter "I" from the Hebrew, through the Greek, to the English. This is the first letter of the Tetragrammaton. Most traditional transliterations represent this Hebrew letter as "Y". The Hebrew letter ( י ) is called "yod".

A

The gold overmark traces the letter "A" from the Hebrew, through the Greek, to the English. This is the second and fourth letter of the Tetragrammaton. Most traditional transliterations represent this Hebrew letter as "H". The Hebrew letter ( ה ) is called "he".

U

The blue overmark traces the letter "U" from the Hebrew, through the Greek, to the English. This is the third letter of the Tetragrammaton. Most traditional transliterations represent this Hebrew letter as "V" or "W". The Hebrew letter ( ו ) is called "vav".

Pronunciation

I believe the translation work of these Hebrew scholars who lived at the time of the ancient Hebrew and were fluent in the Greek of the time is the most valuable and conclusive evidence available. The Greek pronunciation and an example of the transliteration in English is shown from the Strong's Dictionary.

G239
al-lay-loo'-ee-ah
Of hebrew origin (imperative of [H1984] and [H3050]); praise ye Jah!, an adoring exclamation: - alleluiah.

This information can be verified with e-Sword from which it was copied. This information can also be crosschecked with this website.

http://www.blueletterbible.org/lang/lexicon/lexicon.cfm?Strongs=G239&t=KJV

Trace the color-coded underlines to similar words and the color-coded overmarks to identical letters and you will see that the name of God is spelled IAUA and it is pronounced ee-ah-oo-ah.

A name composed of four vowels is highly unusual. The pronunciation is slightly different from what you might initially guess from modern English practice. Modern English has so many different vowel sounds. There are so many different ways to spell them. It is very confusing.

Pronunciation of the vowels following an understanding of Spanish pronunciation is much simpler and matches the witness of the Greek pronunciation. The "i" is pronounced "ee" with a long "e" sound as in "Syria". The "a" is pronounced "ah" with a short "o" sound as in "father" and "Syria". The "u" is pronounced "oo" as in "blue" and "suit".

There are also many examples in English of the correct pronunciation of these vowels when paired. The two-vowel combination "ia" appears in many words such as: India, Syria, Lydia, Cynthia. The two-vowel combination "ua" appears in many words such as: dual, Joshua. I am sure there are many other examples beside these.

Tradition and the opinions of men will disagree with what you see here. It is very difficult to give up established and cherished opinions, even when they are wrong. I prefer the witness of Hebrew scholars who lived with the Hebrew and Greek of the period to those who came later. The actions of the Jews to obfuscate (obscure, confuse, or hide) the name of God have been very successful.

The next chapter arrives at the same results through an entirely different method of study, a second witness.

(Book Contents) Next: Linguistic Evidence


Revised 2015-08-21